Diekmann, Christina: Acute impact of dietary pattern and walking on postprandial metabolism, attention, and mood in older adults with a cardiovascular disease risk phenotype. - Bonn, 2020. - Dissertation, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn.
Online-Ausgabe in bonndoc: https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:hbz:5-57097
@phdthesis{handle:20.500.11811/8170,
urn: https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:hbz:5-57097,
author = {{Christina Diekmann}},
title = {Acute impact of dietary pattern and walking on postprandial metabolism, attention, and mood in older adults with a cardiovascular disease risk phenotype},
school = {Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn},
year = 2020,
month = jan,

note = {Attenuating the postprandial stress response and its associated inflammatory and endothelial events through specific nutritional and lifestyle interventions seems to be a promising and important approach to decrease the susceptibility to the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the long term. This might be particularly relevant in individuals already at increased risk to develop cardiovascular or neurodegenerative complications (e.g., individuals with metabolic syndrome). The present study followed a holistic approach and examined the effects of meal composition and moderate physical activity on postprandial events in 26 older subjects with increased risk for the development of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases (age 70 ± 5 y; BMI 30.3 ± 2.3 kg/m2). In a randomized crossover design, two highenergy meals reflecting different dietary patterns (Mediterranean-type diet meal, MD; Western diet high-fat meal, WD) were combined with either 30-minutes of postprandial moderate walking or 30-minutes of postprandial resting. Next to metabolic outcomes (serum triglycerides, serum non-esterified fatty acids, plasma glucose, serum insulin) the present study included selected oxidative (plasma oxidized low density lipoprotein), endothelial (plasma soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, serum soluble endothelial selectin), and inflammatory (plasma interleukin-6) parameters, as well as blood pressure and heart rate. Additional focus was set on neuropsychological parameters (attention, mood, and the feeling of hunger and satiety) and plasma cortisol concentration. All outcome measures were analyzed at fasting and 1.5 h, 3.0 h, and 4.5 h postprandially. The study tested the following hypotheses: i) a MD generates a lower postprandial response than a WD; ii) moderate walking in the postprandial period as compared to remaining sedentary, results in attenuated postprandial events; iii) a MD generates higher postprandial satiety, postprandial attention, and a better subjective mood than a WD; and iv) moderate walking in the postprandial period as compared to remaining sedentary, results in increased postprandial attention and a better subjective mood. In comparison to the WD, the MD was associated with superior effects on several postprandial parameters (e.g., lower serum triglyceride concentration). Contrary to the hypothesis, data revealed no beneficial effects of walking over resting. Furthermore, meal composition had no relevant impact on attention and mood. However, after the WD, resting instead of walking resulted in increased postprandial attention. Additionally, the MD led to a stronger and longer-lasting feeling of satiety, compared to the WD. Overall, none of the four treatment conditions could be particularly recommended to optimally reduce postprandial metabolic, oxidative, inflammatory, and endothelial events, and to improve postprandial attention and mood. However, due to the steady rise in obesity and metabolic syndrome in recent years, the need for targeted dietary and lifestyle strategies for primary and secondary prevention of concomitant cardiovascular and neurodegenerative complications is constantly increasing. Therefore, further hypothesis-driven postprandial intervention trials reflecting realistic lifestyle conditions are warranted in order to be able to further develop scientifically based prevention recommendations in the long term.},
url = {http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11811/8170}
}

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