Show simple item record

Of Liars and Deniers
The Credibility-Concealed Information Test as a Response Time-Based Measure for Credibility Assessment in Suspects and Witnesses

dc.contributor.advisorBanse, Rainer
dc.contributor.authorEickmeier, Kathrin
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-27T17:54:55Z
dc.date.available2020-04-27T17:54:55Z
dc.date.issued26.02.2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11811/8321
dc.description.abstractThere are numerous studies on polygraphs like the Concealed Information Test (CIT) that aim to detect whether a suspect possesses crime-related knowledge. In contrast, not a single psychophysiological or behavioral paradigm targets the credibility of a victim’s accusation. For that purpose, a Credibility-CIT was developed in four studies. Participants experienced certain situations (truth tellers) or invented a story about these events (liars). Subsequently, the participants were interviewed about the alleged occurrences. The methodological innovation is that the given testimony served as an individual database for the items used in the Credibility-CIT: Short phrases that either referred to a lie or a true statement were selected from each participant’s testimony. These idiographic items, called credibility probe items, were presented in the Credibility-CIT amongst several distractor items while response times and error rates were recorded.
Results of three studies indicate that liars respond more slowly than truth tellers to credibility probe items (dStudy 1 = 0.55, dStudy 2 = 0.42, dStudy 4 = 0.47). Different encoding processes and emotional-motivational factors that induce varying orienting responses provide an explanation for the response time differences. In contrast, Study 3 did not indicate significant differences between truth tellers and liars. Methodological issues – especially regarding the selected response deadline – are discussed. In addition, EEG data were recorded in Study 4 but event-related potentials did not discriminate truth tellers from liars. Lastly, a meta-analysis was conducted over the four studies included in this research project. An overall effect size of g = 0.40 was observed for the Credibility-CIT’s efficiency to discriminate truth tellers from liars based on response times. The results indicate that the Credibility-CIT has a meaningful potential as an indirect measure for credibility assessment.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsIn Copyright
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCredibility Assessment
dc.subjectConcealed Information Test
dc.subjectCIT
dc.subjectmemory detection
dc.subject.ddc150 Psychologie
dc.titleOf Liars and Deniers
dc.title.alternativeThe Credibility-Concealed Information Test as a Response Time-Based Measure for Credibility Assessment in Suspects and Witnesses
dc.typeDissertation oder Habilitation
dc.publisher.nameUniversitäts- und Landesbibliothek Bonn
dc.publisher.locationBonn
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.urnhttps://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:hbz:5-57784
ulbbn.pubtypeErstveröffentlichung
ulbbnediss.affiliation.nameRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
ulbbnediss.affiliation.locationBonn
ulbbnediss.thesis.levelDissertation
ulbbnediss.dissID5778
ulbbnediss.date.accepted2020-01-16
ulbbnediss.institutePhilosophische Fakultät : Institut für Psychologie
ulbbnediss.fakultaetPhilosophische Fakultät
dc.contributor.coRefereeGibbons, Henning


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

The following license files are associated with this item:

InCopyright